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  2. That's great, I get a new idea about it. Thanks
  3. I'm young and love to wear some brand new clothes and accessories. In the fashion show, everyone has a different look and style. I also follow them.
  4. Yesterday
  5. There are private and group crochet classes in AD and Dubai, check SkillDeer
  6. Last week
  7. Hello, I'm Maureeno from Dubai, just join to this forum and glad to be a part of this forum.
  8. Hi Madelyn Did you find a furniture repair person/company? I called the number above, but they don't do repairs, only recovering. Can anyone recommend a company or individual that does furniture repairs? Thanks in advance.
  9. Supply of Shea butter in commercial quantity to GCC region. Any interested parties willing to partner me.
  10. everyone, I'm new here and glad to introduce myself here. I'm a real estate agent or broker in Dubai also has a personal online rentals portal.
  11. Earlier
  12. Hi, My daughter was born in April and I wanted to call like my little flower. Her name is Leilani and I’m a happy Top-Mom What’s spring name your children?
  13. It pains me to write this, but change in my personal circumstances has brought me to this point. Are you an Abu Dhabi woman who desires to help other women living in or moving to Abu Dhabi? Are you the type of woman who can oversee a digital property and help others. Introduce products and services to the benefit of women? Are you interested in acquiring abudhabiwoman.com? Our stats are online. If so, please email info@abudhabiwoman.com or DM me.
  14. Give your rice a boost of flavor with curry powder and herbs that turn this side dish into a feature. Ingredients 125 ml or 1/2 cup uncooked brown or white long grain rice 300 ml or 1 1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth 25 ml or 2 tbsp margarine or butter 125 ml or 1/2 cup chopped celery 125 ml or 1/2 cup sliced mushrooms 125 ml or 1/2 cup shelled chopped pistachios 50 ml or 1/4 cup chopped onion 2 ml or 1/2 tsp dried basil leaves 1 ml or 1/4 tsp curry powder 1 ml or 1/4 tsp ground sage 1 ml or 1/4 tsp pepper 125 ml or 1/2 cup water 250 ml or 1 cup All-Bran Original* cereal or All-Bran Buds* cereal 125 ml or 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds 60 ml or 1/4 chopped cilantro Directions 1. Cook rice according to package directions, replacing with broth and omitting salt and butter or margarine. 2. In large skillet, melt butter or margarine. Stir in celery, mushrooms, water chestnuts and onion. Cook over medium heat stirring occasionally, until celery is tender-crisp. 3. Add basil, curry powder, sage and pepper and stir for about 30 seconds. Stir in cooked rice and water; bring to a boil. Remove from heat and stir in cereal, pomegranate seeds and cilantro. Serve immediately.Check out my blog for more recipes
  15. Commercial kitchens from Milan to Sydney to Singapour to Dallas are serving Panna Cotta these days. I get the impression that most chefs the world over think that Italy is where the mediterranean starts and ends! I wish they would serve what we call ashtaliyeh.Ashta is the word for cream in Arabic and ashtaliyeh is the pudding derived from it; a bit deceiving, because it does not contain cream! This is a very creamy pudding, without any cream! It is thickened with cornstarch which avoids the rubberiness that comes from gelatin; it is nearly unsweetened and served with a syrup on the side. Flavorings are traditionally orange blossom and rose water and mastic. This is a recipe from a Lebanese chef and restaurant owner in the UK, Hussien Dekmak. It is an extra rich recipe that adds some cream cheese spread such as Kiri to the pudding; optional, since the pudding can just as easily be made with milk alone. Time to make? figure on less than 10 minutes; however, it needs to cool and firm up in the fridge, preferably overnight. INGREDIENTS : 4 servings Ashtaliyeh: 1 pint of milk (500ml) 1 tablespoon of sugar 1/4 cup of cornstarch (add one tablespoon more if you like it stiffer) 75 g of Kiri or 3 ounces of cream cheese spread (optional) 3 pebbles of mastic-optional- 1 teaspoon of orange blossom water and 1 teaspoon of rose water For the syrup: (You will most likely have some leftover, which is fine, it will keep for several weeks in the fridge) 1 cup of granulated sugar 1/2 cup of water a squirt of lemon (about a teaspoon) a teaspoon of orange blossom water, a teaspoon of rose water To garnish the ashtaliyeh: A couple of tablespoons of pistachios, ground in a mortar with a pinch of sugar METHOD: 1. Heat 1 1/2 cups of milk, sugar and cheese over medium heat, stirring to dissolve both the sugar and cheese. Take the cornstarch and dissolve in the remaining milk. As soon as the milk mixture starts steaming, add the cornstarch and keep stirring nonstop for a couple of minutes until the mixture thickens. 2. Add the mastic, the orange blossom and rose water, stir for 10 seconds and remove from the stove. 3. Pour the pudding mixture through a strainer into a bowl or measuring cup, pushing it through with a spoon to get it as smooth as possible. 4. Pour into several ramequins. Cool on the counter and then chill in the fridge overnight uncovered. How to use the mastic: The mastic or miskeh (in Arabic) is sold in Middle-Eastern groceries; it is imported from Greece. The store where I shop keeps it under lock and in small jars. It comes in tiny pebbles. It needs to be ground up in order to be mixed into the pudding in the last minutes of cooking. My method was to grind it in a tiny marble mortar with a pinch of sugar until powdery and throw the lot into the milk mixture; the problem is that this method leaves a residue of mastic in the mortar. Another method which was recommended by Peter from kalofagas.ca is to freeze the mastic for a minimum of two hours (I would keep the jar in the freezer); then place the pebbles between two sheets of plastic wrap and pulverize them with a rolling pin. He claims this method uses up every last speck of mastic. To make the syrup: 1. Place the sugar and water in a saucepan; bring to a boil and boil for 3 minutes; add the lemon juice and keep boiling the syrup for a total of 12 minutes. Add the flavorings at the end, cool the syrup and serve alongside the ashtaliyeh for those who like it sweeter. 2. When ready to serve the ashtaliyeh, sprinkle the top with a little ground pistachios. 3. If unable to secure the cream cheese spread (called Puck or Kiri in Middle-Eastern groceries) substitute some cream for the milk (about 1/2 cup) and proceed as above.Check out my blog for more recipes
  16. Recipe by Peter GordonMore often than not, this classic North African dish is vegetarian and, much as I am happy to eat it that way, I prefer this spiced up version containing lamb — although simply omit it if you prefer.Ingredients3 Tbsp Olive oil¼ tsp Cumin seeds½ tsp Sesame seeds2 Onions, peeled and thinly sliced2 Red capsicums, deseeded and sliced2 Garlic cloves, peeled and chopped¼ tsp Paprika, or cayenne pepper150 g Lean lamb, minced (optional)6 Ripe tomatoes, diced (or 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes and a little tomato pasta)4 Eggs50 ml Plain yoghurt1 small handful Parsley, mint and corianderDirections1. Ideally you want to serve this in the dish you cook it in, so a large frying pan with a lid is good.2. Heat up the pan and add the olive oil, cumin and sesame seeds.3. Once they begin to sizzle, add the onions, capsicums, garlic and paprika or cayenne pepper. Saute until the vegetables collapse, stirring frequently.4. Add the mince (if using) and a little salt. Cook until the lamb crumbles, stirring all the time.5. Add the tomatoes and bring to a boil, then cook over moderate heat for 6–8 minutes, at which point much of the juice will have evaporated.6. Make four impressions in the mixture and break an egg into each “hole”.7. Spoon on the yoghurt, put a lid on the pan and cook until the eggs have begun to set, but still have runny yolks.8. Scatter with the shredded herbs and serve immediately, straight from the pan.This recipe is from Peter Gordon's new book 'Eating Well Everyday'.Check out my blog for more recipes
  17. MrsKurt

    Implanon removal

    Hai Zma, May I know how much the cost for Implanon inserts? Does it cover by insurance? Thanks in advance
  18. puerto 99

    Puerto 99

    Have you heard about the Best Mexican food Restaurant in Dubai? if not then you can Visit the Puerto 99. One of the best Restaurant in Dubai as if you like seafood, Mexican Cuisine or something else to Drink with after food
  19. Hi all, I live in UAE, Ajman, originally from UK. I had a staffy in the UK and now life is a little settled, I wanted to get another dog. So I'm looking for a male, 7 to 8 weeks old, staffy, so an english staffordshire bull terrier. Does anyone know where I can get a puppy from please? I have been looking for the last year but cant seem to find one, where as I have seen so many adult staffy's around, I'm sure some of them must be having little baby staffs!! Lol.... please reply to jaymene04@gmail.com. please, please. Thank you very much!! Jay.
  20. This is a new post from Expat Child by Carole Hallett Mobbs Expat Child - Moving overseas with children. Relocation advice. Moving to the US? Why a good credit score will make the transition easier – for the whole family No ... The post How to build credit history when you move to the US appeared first on Expat Child. View the full article
  21. I'm currently in the same situation coincidently, having difficulty to choose between the two nurseries. Where did you choose eventually? If anyone could help us with their feedback on both.
  22. An afternoon spent in disguise leads to a passion that … She wanted to explore the promise of his kiss. He wanted to persuade her to become his mistress.... Vote Here
  23. salamoalykom

    any question about Urinary Tract ,Male Infertility .

    i am Dr.Medhat Elsayed ,happy to reply.:scratch:

  24. Hi Scientist Girl! Hope your pregnancy is going well? I delivered at Brightpoint Women's hospital with Dr Feroza. She's fabulous! Good luck and best wishes!
  25. It’s in the movies we see. It’s in the news stories we hear. Every man is stirred by the heroic. From boyhood on, we search for heroes, starting with our... Vote Here
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